Ah, “springtime” in London

The forecast said no rain and a temp in the mid teens, so I decided to finally shed my winter coat (it’s been a long, cold winter with record snowfall) and wear my vintage leather jacket for the first time. Not too bad on my way catching buses to the clinic, but when I came out just after two o’clock the wind was picking up and it sure didn’t feel like the temp had made it into the teens as forecast. I arrived a couple of minutes early to the bus stop. There’s no shelter there and it’s pretty open, so the wind has a chance to really pick-up, which it did. As it got worse and worse I realized the bus was very late; in fact, I waited over forty minutes before a bus came along. I discovered after contacting London Transit that the bus I should have caught had broken down. By the time I caught the bus I couldn’t feel my ears or toes. It was a good thing I had just got over a cold or I would have come down with pneumonia, I’m sure. Continue reading

My Life – Family

This will be the hardest blog to write because what has happened with my kids is the biggest regret of my life. Those who knew me way back when, when the kids were young, know I was a “family man”. Nothing was more important to me.  I struggled with the fact that my own birth family had packed up and moved out West without me, but my priority was my own family and I accepted that without question. I lived for my kids. Continue reading

My Life – Where I lived

My parents moved around a lot when I was just a youngun. We lived for a time at Donalda Farms, which was to eventually become Don Mills. We lived in Ajax. Not sure where else bvut we eventually moved in with my grandparents at 7 Hugo Avenue in Toronto. My grandfather passed away soon after we moved in. When I was just about to turn twelve we moved out to the country, to a farm house north of Streetsville, now part of Mississauga. After living in the “big city” where I could go anywhere I wanted to, to living in the middle of nowhere, miles from anything, I was pissed at my parents. Eventually I learned to play with my brother and sister and we had lots of fun. The saving grace was that all my parent’s friends came out on the weekends and brought their kids, so there was always lots of kids around to play with. I was always the oldest though, so I did more babysitting than playing. Continue reading

My Life – Vehicles

Might be a strange thing to write about, but a vehicle is an integral part of your life, right? My very first car was a Vauxall Viva, a boxy little thing. I paid a whopping $100 for it and worked so lovingly on cleaning it from stem to stern. I barely had it a week when a drunk hit me on Queen Street in Brampton and totaled it. He was going so fast that it spun me around and when the car hit the curb my head went through the driver’s side windows. I just remember waking up covered in glass and I had no idea what happened. Because I was turning left into the Dairy Queen I was charged. When I eventually found a witness to the accident they told me the guy was fish-tailing all over the road and hit me from the wrong side of the road. Plus he was drunk, something the officer somehow missed. I learned later that he was at the end of his shift and just wanted to get home. It took years and many court dates to finally have it dismissed, but in the meantime I paid much higher insurance because I had been charged. The never gave me the money back when the charges were dropped. Continue reading

My Life – People

One of the biggest regrets of my life is that I lost touch with all of the people who made such a difference in my life. I think this is part of the reason that Facebook is so popular because it allows us to “friend” people and to stay in touch no matter where we go. If I had it to do all over again I would get the names and addresses and email addys for everyone I came into contact with. I regret that in a fit of cleaning up and reducing my luggage as much as I could when I returned from Panama I threw out a large file folder I had had for decades, called my “Idea File” in which I had not only upteen business ideas but also a list of many friends from my married days. No idea why I threw it away. Continue reading

My Life – Career Jobs

My very first job was plowing, for which I made the grand sum of fifty cents an hour. I guess you always remember your first, because it feels like yesterday even though I was only about thirteen at the time. I don’t remember how I got the job; probably through my Dad because he knew Ernie Broklebank, our neighbor to the south. He taught me how to drive the tractor, which was fairly easy because I had been driving our Jeep quite a bit. All I remember was that after each track down the field I had to get off and remove all the big boulders I had picked up. It was very hard work, but I was saving up to buy a bike so I plugged away. Continue reading

My Life – Women

This is a tough one for me, only because I revere women and my memory isn’t what it used to be, so I am terrified of leaving someone out. I doubt many of them will even remember me, so hopefully that means they won’t be offended. The ones who were special to me know who they are.

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